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Hans and Christine Nissen, c1863

In 1876, the Nissen Family comprising Hans Christian Nissen, his wife Christine Frederickke Nissen (nee Boisen), and their five children aged 2 to 11, sailed from the port of Kiel in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany (previously Denmark), for England. On 25th May 1876, they then left England for Australia in the City of Adelaide.

The family are listed in the passenger list for the voyage. The passengers on this voyage were all assisted migrants from Germany and the passengers were described as labourers - Hans, was a cabinetmaker-joiner. The family regarded themselves as coming from Denmark, however Schleswig, the part of Denmark where that had been living had been annexed as part of Germany in 1864.

The Nissen Family received free passage from the South Australian Govenment to migrate to South Australia. After the voyage, the family kept the Passenger's Contract Ticket issued by the Emigration Agent for South Australia, presumably in London. The ticket ended up in the posessions of Maren Nissen, who was the youngest member of the family who travelled on the City of Adelaide - only two years old in 1876. Maren was a keen genealogist, ahead of her time, and kept many scrapbooks recording her family history. These have been passed down in her family, and the ticket survives to this day.

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Hans and Christine Nissen, c1863

In 1876, the Nissen Family comprising Hans Christian Nissen, his wife Christine Frederickke Nissen (nee Boisen), and their five children aged 2 to 11, sailed from the port of Kiel in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany (previously Denmark), for England. On 25th May 1876, they then left England for Australia in the City of Adelaide.

The family are listed in the passenger list for the voyage. The passengers on this voyage were all assisted migrants from Germany and the passengers were described as labourers - Hans, was a cabinetmaker-joiner. The family regarded themselves as coming from Denmark, however Schleswig, the part of Denmark where that had been living had been annexed as part of Germany in 1864.

The Nissen Family received free passage from the South Australian Govenment to migrate to South Australia. After the voyage, the family kept the Passenger's Contract Ticket issued by the Emigration Agent for South Australia, presumably in London. The ticket ended up in the posessions of Maren Nissen, who was the youngest member of the family who travelled on the City of Adelaide - only two years old in 1876. Maren was a keen genealogist, ahead of her time, and kept many scrapbooks recording her family history. These have been passed down in her family, and the ticket survives to this day.

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Joseph Towan Nancarrow (b1855) and daughters

In the 1860s, the decline of mining in Cornwall left many miners unemployed. Many Cornishmen migrated to Moonta in South Australia where the newly-opened copper mines were booming and work was plentiful. Amongst these were 17 years old Joseph Towan Nancarrow his parents, six siblings, aunty and two young cousins, who migrated to South Australia on the City of Adelaide in 1873. Once in South Australia, Joseph and his father and brothers resumed work as miners where they found reasonably continuous work at the Yelta Copper Mine.

In 1879, Joseph built his own house and married Elizabeth Nicholls. Joseph and Elizabeth had seven children between 1880 and 1892, losing one of them at a few weeks of age. On 3rd May 1894, 39 years old Elizabeth died at her home while giving birth to her eighth child, a daughter who survived only for another three weeks. The following year Joseph Towan, 39, a widower with six children, remarried a widow with five young children of her own - Mrs Esther Potter, 30. Joseph and Esther had five more children of their own, but three died before their first birthday, and only two sons lived to adulthood.

Joseph Towan Nancarrow was a typical Cornishman or "Cousin Jack", and spoke with the rich accent of one. He was short of stature, ginger haired, with the palest of pale blue eyes, and was very witty. For a trade he knew only mining, although in his later years when work was short, he did supplement his income for short periods as a fisherman, the other age-old tradition of the Cornish.

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The Judell Family in 1896

Leopold Jϋdell was born on 25 July 1848 in Altona, Schleswig-Holstein, the youngest son of a prominent local merchant, Wolff Jϋdell and his first wife Hannchen née Mendel.

At this time several provinces of modern Germany were being united into a German Confederation with the help of aggressive Prussian occupation, and there was armed conflict in those parts of Europe where the changes were unwelcome. In 1867 control of Altona passed from Denmark to the Kingdom of Prussia, creating the entity of Schleswig-Holstein. Such turmoil and, probably, additional strain imposed on them by increased cultural discrimination, prompted Leopold’s generation of Jϋdells to emigrate from Altona.

After renouncing his Prussian citizenship, and a few weeks before the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War, 21 years old Leopold made his way to London where he boarded the City of Adelaide in May 1870 to join his brothers Hermann and Moritz Wolff who had already migrated to South Australia. The ship left Shadwell Basin in the River Thames on 24th May, called at Plymouth and reached Port Adelaide on 18th August after a voyage of nearly three months. Throughout the journey Leopold kept a diary of each day’s events written in his native Germanic dialect.

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