Hawker, Alfred - I50

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First Class Passenger 
Alfred Hawker
10 Jan 1831 – 10 Feb 1868
Nationality Unknown
Born 10 Jan 1831
England
Died 10 Feb 1868
Genealogy Data
Person ID I50
Birth Family
Hawker Family - F19147
Father Edward Hawker
Mother Jane Naomee Poore
Voyage Data
Voyage to Adelaide in 1865
Personal role First Class Passenger
Name on list Mr. Alfred Hawker
Joined place London
Left place Adelaide
Voyage to Adelaide in 1866
Personal role First Class Passenger
Name on list Mr. Alfred Hawker
Joined place London
Left place Adelaide

Alfred Hawker (1831-1868) was born in Hampshire, England, the youngest son of Admiral Edward Hawker and his wife Jane Naomi neé Poore.

The Hawkers were already a wealthy family. Like all of his siblings Alfred received the best of education in the old country, before he emigrated to South Australia at some stage to join three of his older brothers, James, George and Charles, who had been very early pioneers and had already made their way in the colony. Alfred was certainly in South Australia by May 1851 as his name was seen in South Australian newspapers from that year.[1][2][3]

In September 1859, in Adelaide, Alfred found clerical work in the Public Works Department and then in the office of the Clerk of Assembly.[4] In this role he was a much over-shadowed member of his remarkable extended family.

His grand-father and father in turn had illustrious careers in the Royal Navy, serving on warships fighting the French in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

His three brothers established the ‘Bungaree’ sheep station near Clare, to the north of Adelaide. The property was later extended to 80,000 acres, much attention was paid to importing top-class Merinos and the breeding of sheep, and its wool gained a high reputation. The brothers became even more wealthy.

George subsequently entered Parliament where he had a distinguished career as Speaker, then Commissioner of Public Works. James left the land to eventually become Comptroller of H M Customs at Port Adelaide.

Alfred resigned from his clerical role in December 1861.[5] On 30 December 1861, Alfred sailed for London on the ship Murray.

Alfred was back in Adelaide by October 1864, when he took on the role as Acting Librarian in the South Australian Parliamentary Library.[6] The same month, Alfred had an auction of all his household funiture, his chestnut mare and buggy, a harmonium he had imported from England, and all of his books.[7][8] The reason stated in the advertisement was that he was proceeding to England. Many of his books were passed in at the auction and were put up for sale by his agents.[9]

Alfred Hawker was never married. He appears to have chosen to become one of those 'colonists of long standing who made regular trips to England', spending up to half the year in the luxury of a first-class cabin at sea.

An 'Alfred Hawker' or 'A Hawker' has been noted on the following voyages. The chronology of these voyages suggests that they are the same person.

  • The ship Murray, master J Legoe, sailed from Adelaide on 30 December 1861, and arrived at Gravesend on 30 April 1862 with Misses Hawker (2) and Mr A Hawker in the cabin.[10]
  • The ship Murray sailed from Plymouth on 15 July 1863 with Alfred Hawker on board.[11]
  • The City of Adelaide, master David Bruce, left London on 26 July 1865 and arrived in Adelaide on 12 October 1865 with Alfred Hawker.[12][13]
  • The ship Orient, master John Harris, left Adelaide on 9 November 1865 with Archdeacon Woodcock and A Hawker on board. Alfred Hawker placed an advertisement in the papers on 6 November advising any debtors to forward their accounts to his agents immediately.[14]
  • The City of Adelaide, master David Bruce, left London for Adelaide on 27 July 1866, and arrived on 11 October 1866 with passengers Archdeacon Woodcock and Alfred Hawker. (Perhaps both were hoping that life at sea would alleviate their suffering from health problems.)
  • The ship Murray, master James Smart, cleared out for London on 6 November 1866 with an Alfred Hawker.[15]

On 18 January 1868, the St Leonards left Adelaide for London. On board was Alfred Hawker who died at sea three weeks later on 10 February 1868. It was not until 10 June that the news was received by mail from St Helena, and it was published in the Adelaide newspapers.[16]


The Hawker Family

James Hawker

James Hawker, Alfred’s grand-father, served on HMS Sardoine in 1766. Commanded the Hero in 1774 and was with the Squadron under Commodore Johnstone when attacked by M. de Suffrein, at Porto Praya, in 1781.

Admiral Edward Hawker

Alfred’s father was Admiral Edward Hawker (1782-1860) who had a distinguished record of fights against the French fleets, especially in West Indian waters. When at home, his town house was in Cavendish Square, London, and Ashford Lodge, in the Hampshire parish of Steep and near Petersfield, was the country estate.

Edward Hawker joined the Royal Navy and HMS Pegasus in May 1786, was rated as Midshipman in 1793, Lieutenant in 1796 and Captain in 1804. He served on at least 18 warships, and saw much action in battle. He was retired to half-pay in 1830, and became an Admiral in 1837. (This was the retirement plan for the most senior officers.)

George Charles Hawker

George Charles Hawker (1818 –1895) was born in Hampshire, England, the second son of Admiral Edward Hawker and his first wife Joanna Naomi, née Poore. He was educated partly on the continent, then at Trinity College, Cambridge from 1836.

He qualified for his B.A. degree early in 1840, and in September of that year arrived in South Australia on the Lysander with his younger brother Charles. His brother James had previously migrated there in 1838. He had considerable capital to start with, and he and his brothers James and Charles established a sheep station afterwards known as Bungaree. Some of the early station buildings were put up with their own hands.

George entered Parliament in 1858 and in 1860 became Speaker. He returned to England with his family in January 1865 and lived there until 1874. Upon his return to the colony he re-entered the political arena in 1875, retiring in 1883. In his earlier days a first rate speaker who sometimes rose to eloquence.

He was Commissioner of Public Works in 1877-1881, and later Chief Secretary. In 1889 he visited India to inquire into the irrigation question.

The northern township of Hawker was named in his honour.

George Hawker held a leading position as a citizen of South Australia. Extremely wealthy, and a good employer, he was much interested in the every-day life of the colony, a follower of cricket, racing, and coursing, a supporter of the Agricultural and Horticultural Society, and the Zoological Society.

He died on 21 May 1895. If he had lived a few days longer the Queen would have bestowed on him a knighthood.

He had married in December 1845 Bessie, daughter of Henry Seymour of County Galway, who survived him with six sons and six daughters. The family had lived at ‘The Briars’ in the elite Adelaide suburb of Medindie.

James Collins Hawker

James Collins Hawker (1821-1901) arrived in Adelaide as early as October 1838 on the Pestonjee Bomanjee with Governor Gawler, an old friend of his father. He served as his extra aide-de-camp, and assistant in his private secretary’s office.

In an interesting and varied subsequent career, he first became a surveyor and was engaged in sectional surveying along the South Road from Adelaide to Encounter Bay.

He then joined his brothers George and Charles in setting up the Bundaree run near Clare, until he sold his share to George in 1843. James went to live at Moorundie where he was among the three earliest settlers on the River Murray. Early in his colonial life he was in a party that was involved in a very serious skirmish with many local aborigines, and in1844 he joined Captain Charles Sturt's exploration into the interior.

When the venture at Moorundie proved unsuccessful, he obtained a position with H M Customs at Port Adelaide as a landing waiter, before becoming, in turn, Tide Surveyor, then Measuring Surveyor of Shipping to the Board of Trade. In 1863 he was appointed Comptroller of H M Customs.

In October 1850 James married Louisa, youngest daughter of the Harbour-Master, Captain Lipson RN. They lived for many years at ‘Ashford’, a large home on Strangways Terrace in North Adelaide. After nearly 25 years in the Customs branch, James’ eyesight deteriorated, so he retired and entered into commercial life as a well=known land and station agent and surveyor in his own firm James C Hawker and Son.

Unlike his brother George, James played no part in public life. He devoted much time to the Masonic Lodge of which he was one of the leading members. He was a keen sportsman as a rower and ‘with the gun and rod’. He left a widow, three sons and five daughters.

Charles Lloyd Hawker

Charles Lloyd Hawker (1823-1861) set up the Amana sheep station near Clare where he successfully engaged in pastoral pursuits. In April 1861 he was staying at an Adelaide hotel with his wife and three children preparing to take a trip back to England, and he had just arranged for his brother George to look after his interests.

For some time he had suffered from a ‘disease of the heart’. Before breakfast he felt unwell, his usual treatment of ‘sal volatile and peppermint’ could not save him, and he died suddenly at the young age of 38.

His brother George subsequently incorporated Amana into his Bungaree run.

Rev. William Henry Hawker

In direct contrast to his brothers, Rev. William Henry Hawker (1827-1874) literally stayed at home in England. After his father’ death he inherited Ashford Manor. He became the curate in the local church and, in 1869, the first vicar of the parish of Steep that contains the manor house.


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Notes


References

  1. "Thursday, 8th May.". South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839-1900) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 10 May 1851. p. 3. Retrieved 30 May 2011. 
  2. "COURT OF REVISION FOR THE DISTRICT OF STANLEY.". South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839-1900) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 14 May 1853. p. 3. Retrieved 30 May 2011. 
  3. "CELEBRATION OF HER MAJESTY'S BIRTHDAY.". The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858-1889) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 20 May 1859. p. 3. Retrieved 30 May 2011. 
  4. "THE GOVERNMENT GAZETTE.". South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839-1900) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 2 September 1859. p. 3. Retrieved 30 May 2011. 
  5. "APPOINTMENTS.". South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839-1900) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 20 December 1861. p. 4. Retrieved 30 May 2011. 
  6. "THE COMPETITIVE EXAMINATIONS.". South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839-1900) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 7 October 1864. p. 2. Retrieved 30 May 2011. 
  7. "Advertising.". The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858-1889) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 19 October 1864. p. 4. Retrieved 30 May 2011. 
  8. "Advertising.". South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839-1900) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 19 October 1864. p. 4. Retrieved 30 May 2011. 
  9. "Advertising.". South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839-1900) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 25 October 1864. p. 4. Retrieved 30 May 2011. 
  10. "SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.". South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839-1900) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 30 December 1861. p. 2. Retrieved 30 May 2011. 
  11. "SHIPPING NEWS.". The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858-1889) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 10 September 1863. p. 2. Retrieved 30 May 2011. 
  12. "Advertising.". South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839-1900) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 26 October 1865. p. 1. Retrieved 30 May 2011. 
  13. "TOPICS OF THE DAY.". The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858-1889) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 10 September 1863. p. 2. Retrieved 30 May 2011. 
  14. "Advertising.". South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839-1900) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 7 November 1865. p. 1. Retrieved 30 May 2011. 
  15. "SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.". South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839-1900) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 7 November 1866. p. 2. Retrieved 30 May 2011. 
  16. "TOPICS OF THE DAY". The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858-1889) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 10 June 1868. p. 2. Retrieved 30 May 2011. 

The South Australian Register and The Advertiser, Adelaide, 22 May 1895;

Admissions to Trinity College, Cambridge, 1801-50;

Commonwealth Parliamentary Handbook, 1938;

Who's Who in Australia, 1941, Obituary.

Alfred Hawker

Theft of jewels etc Register Thursday 2 November 1865 p2

Just returned with cable piece. Register, Thursday 18 October 1866 p2.

Back to Adelaide on CofA, letter from Captain Bruce. Register Monday 13 August 1866 p2

George Hawker

  • SLSA Portrait 1870
  • SLSA Portrait 1840
  • SLSA Portrait 1880

'Briars' - home of G. C. Hawker - Mr. Hawker on front steps ca 1880 The home is now McBride Hospital. 15 Briar Ave, . Medindie

James Hawker

SLSA Portrait 1898


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